Every day is a school day

There have been a number of professional learning events over the last few weeks that I’ve engaged with that have challenged my thinking. I’ve summarised a few of these within this blog post.

DiverseEd – World Book Day – Thursday 4th March 2021

“You can’t be what you can’t see.”

Hosted by Hannah Wilson, this event showcased diverse authors sharing their journey to get published and they talked about some of the barriers to getting their voices out there. I didn’t take many notes within the session as I found it really inspiring just to listen in. The common themes of courage and defeating imposter syndrome came through here. I don’t remember which panelist said it, but when asked about getting over the fear, they spoke about how important the message is. The message was too important for them not to share! I’m reading The Infinite Game by Simon Sinek at the moment, reading about organisations having a just cause which keeps its people going, these authors have a just cause. Karl Pupe shared the story of one of his students learning that he’d written a book and how proud this made him. It really highlighted the power of representation. Whilst I’ve really tried to ensure a diverse library in my class, Andrew Moffat made me reflect on what I’m doing with them. It’s not just about having the texts, it’s about the lessons and discussions that go along with them. I have used picture books, such as Counting on Katherine by Helaine Becker, to prompt discussion around aspirations for people of colour and the girls in my class, and regularly choose whole class novels which promote kindness and celebrating our differences, such as Wonder by R.J. Palacio, but I have more work to do in this area.

You can watch the recording of the event here.

NewEdLeaders – Saturday 6th March 2021

“Humans first, learners second. Humans first, professionals second.”

Mary Myatt

Whilst I’m probably not the intended audience for the event, I felt I had to attend because there were so many people I wanted to hear from! Hosted by Emma Turner and friends, the event was aimed (as the name suggests!) at new leaders within education, but as the saying goes “teachers are leaders of learning” so there were definitely a number of sessions I found inspiring. In her session “Curriculum: the good, the bad & the ugly”, Mary Myatt encouraged us to question why we are teaching what we are teaching and what specifically we want the children to learn, whilst also driving home the message that we are all humans first. I also loved Alison Kriel’s session where she talked about the “unmeasured curriculum”, which highlighted the importance of a strong health and wellbeing curriculum. She referred to meetings with large companies about the skills and competencies they were looking for in future employees, lots to consider with our Developing the Young Workforce work.

Unsurprisingly, I am really interested in professional learning and I have recently taken on a new role to develop this further within my school. With this in mind, I was looking forward to Tom Sherrington’s session, “Does your QA culture support Professional Learning?”. Tom shared the need for systems to support a professional learning culture, whilst highlighting the importance of teacher autonomy here. Teachers don’t need to attend CPD sessions that are irrelevant to them or their practice. We are fortunate, within Scotland, that a large part of our CLPL hours are self-directed. Whilst I know there are times when whole-staff / authority-wide professional learning is necessary and beneficial, identifying our own areas for development and actively seeking out learning opportunities, with the support of our SLT, is really empowering. This session then led on to Tom, Emma, and Kathryn Morgan discussing distributed leadership and delegation. I found myself reflecting both on how my own SLT practises this within our school, where we are trusted to develop our practice and work on collegiate projects, and also on how I work with my stage partner, who is an NQT. I forget who stated that giving teachers’ responsibility with parameters makes this work better. It really is powerful to know that your leader trusts you to do something, but it definitely helps to know what the parameters or expectations are before you start. I find delegation difficult, particularly in areas where I feel passionate. Reading Dare to Lead by Brené Brown has also prompted me to reflect on this and I’m working to develop here.

You can watch the recording of this event here.

WomenEd Book Club – Sunday 7th March 2021

“We need different voices to make a great team, with similar values but different experiences”

Dr Melissa McCauley

Hosted by Kiran Sunray, this @WomenEdBookClub event featured the authors of the second WomenEd book, Being 10% Braver, sharing their stories. When the second book came out, I decided I couldn’t buy it until I’d finished the first one… I ordered it as soon as this event ended.

Similar to the DiverseEd event, I didn’t take many notes during this event, preferring to listen and reflect on points that chimed with my own experiences and those I’d never considered before. Many of the panelists talked about confidence, imposter syndrome, the power of mentorship, authenticity, mental health. There really was a lot to reflect on. I found Ruth Golding’s contributions about ableism and the experiences of people with disabilities really thought-provoking. She recommended Alice Wong’s book, Disability Visibility, for those who wanted to learn more which I’m now looking forward to reading. I’ve heard Penny Rabiger speak at a few different (virtual) events and I loved what she said about being a catalyst for change. “It’s not all about you. Get the ball in the air, then pass it.”

I felt really inspired by the whole event, especially after hearing Bukky Yusuf’s call to action, “Okay, you’ve read the book. Now what?”. I’m excited to find out.

You can watch the recording of this event here.

Northern Alliance Innovative Approaches to Curriculum Delivery – Thursday 11th March 2021

A series of sessions facilitated by Audrey Buchanan, this professional learning group offers an opportunity for practitioners across the Northern Alliance to connect and share best practice. The focus of this series is retrieval practice and how we can utilise digital technologies to embed retrieval practice in our teaching. Having recently attended an online event by Kate Jones (recording available here), I have really enjoyed being able to discuss retrieval practice theory and strategies with teachers across different stages. I left this session inspired to start a new practitioner enquiry when we return to school. My plan has also been informed by a collegiate professional learning discussion my colleague facilitated a few days earlier, where a number of us met to discuss the teaching of maths online and what we would like to continue when we return to the physical classroom. This is a further example of the distributed leaderships and opportunities afforded to teachers in my school. I will write more about this enquiry in a separate blog post.

WomenEd Scotland – Connect and Communicate – Saturday 13th March 2021

Hosted by Lena Carter, Christine Couser, and Parm Plummer, this session was more of a networking event than strictly professional learning but I just had to include it in this blog post as it was such a great start to the weekend! The hosts shared some of the history of WomenEd Scotland and then we went into breakout rooms to share thoughts around the topic of women in leadership in education. It was great to get a chance to hear from educators that I follow or have engaged with on Twitter and I really enjoyed the format of the breakout rooms. They followed the #SpacesForListening structure which was a really powerful way of ensuring everyone’s voices were heard:

There were a number of common themes that came out of all the breakout rooms and I’ve pulled some of those together in this word cloud:

As we return to our physical classrooms, this week, I am looking forward to seeing my class and my colleagues in person. Reflecting on the last few months, I’m pleased I have developed some positive habits (with my one word for 2021 in mind) such as reading, painting, regular baths, long walks in the park. I’ve been fortunate to engage with a number of professional learning events, podcasts, and ongoing dialogue with education practitioners across the world. I’m hopeful and excited to see what the next few weeks will bring.

I’d love to hear from you if you also attended some of the events I’ve referred to above or if you have recommendations of other events / reading material / podcasts you have enjoyed. Comment below or follow me on Twitter, @ClareAnnePirie.

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